School of Education News

Fri
Aug
10
The Capital Times newspaper featured UW-Madison alumnus Kaleem Caire in an article detailing the upcoming launch of his first charter school for kindergartners. Caire, who earned his undergraduate degree from the School of Education in 2000, is a national leader in K-12 education reform, economic and workforce development, and community transformation. Caire's One City Early Learning Center will expand to One City Schools this fall, which is "one of the state’s first 4K and kindergarten charter options authorized by the University of Wisconsin System’s Office of Educational Opportunity," reports The Cap Times.
Thu
Aug
09
The Wisconsin Collaborative Education Research Network (The Network) hosted the Wisconsin Education Tour, a two-day excursion and exploration of educational opportunities in Wisconsin. Starting at the Education Building, 45 international and domestic graduate students and visiting scholars gathered each day and boarded a bus to visit multiple educational sites around south-central and southeastern Wisconsin in early May. The dynamic and informative tour included stops and learning opportunities at four distinct educational institutions, including a rural school district, an urban charter school, an early childhood education center, and a community school.
Wed
Aug
08
UW-Madison alumna Jessica Stovall is featured in the new STARZ documentary, "America to Me." Stovall earned a degree in secondary education from the School of Education in 2007, and is about to move to Palo Alto, California, to pursue a Ph.D. in race, inequality, and language in education at Stanford University. Premiering on Aug. 26, "America to Me" is a 10-episode documentary series that asks the question, "Can a Chicago-area high school change the conversation about race?" Stovall is also part of the social impact campaign, which is using the film to make positive change in race and equity in schools across the United States.
Tue
Aug
07
Brava recently quoted UW-Madison's Walter Stern in an article about how lifelong learning keeps the brain healthy. Stern is an assistant professor with the School of Education's Department of Educational Policy Studies. In the magazine article, Stern speaks about how he supports auditors and seniors returning to the classroom, and sees them as assets to classroom culture.
Mon
Aug
06
As a mother of three young children, with a full-time job and a small hobby farm, Laura Schaffer knew going back to school would be challenging. But in just three years, she’ll earn an advanced degree through the University of Wisconsin–Madison’s online Doctor of Occupational Therapy program, which is housed within the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology. “The program offers flexibility while keeping you on a timeline,” Schaffer said. “Although time consuming, it is achievable, and the benefits far outweigh the stress.”
Mon
Aug
06
UW-Madison alumna Alison E. Leonard was awarded tenure and promoted to Associate Professor of Arts and Creativity in the College of Education at Clemson University. Leonard earned her Ph.D. from the School of Education's Department of Curriculum and Instruction in 2012.
Fri
Aug
03
Imaging Self, a new summer program from the UW-Madison School of Education, gives high school students the opportunity to explore the arts -- and themselves -- in a college setting. The three-week residential program helps students build their own arts portfolios while earning college credit and gaining an understanding of what it's like to be a student studying the arts on the UW-Madison campus.
Thu
Aug
02
A new Vialogues video features UW-Madison’s Maxine McKinney de Royston discussing an article she co-authored and that appeared in the Teachers College Record. McKinney de Royston is an assistant professor with the School of Education's Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Positive student-teacher relationships are known to benefit students' experiences in school and academic success, but positive student-teacher relationships are not the norm for African-American male students. In the article, McKinney de Royston researches what characterizes teacher-student relationships within all-black, all-male classrooms.
Thu
Aug
02
The third installment of the art gallery "Being Forward" by UW-Madison alumnae Brenda Baker and Bird Ross will be on display in the School of Education Gallery from Aug. 1 to 31. The "Being Forward" exhibition includes over 150 photographs featuring Madison women artists and art supporters posing as Ms. Forward, the iconic statue that has been on the Capitol grounds since her installation in 1895. Baker and Ross have the goal of raising $300,000 for the Woman Artists Forward Fund, which is being established to fund unrestricted grants for women visual artists in the Madison area long into the future.
Wed
Aug
01
A report from Madison's CBS affiliate, WISC-TV/Ch. 3, features a study from UW-Madison's David Bell that explores how overspecialization in youth sports connects to daytime tiredness. Bell is an assistant professor with the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology. Bell's study explores the issues that are linked to focusing too much on one sport, otherwise known as overspecialization, including how overspecialized young athletes are much more likely to get tired during the day.
Tue
Jul
31
Rich Halverson was recently named the UW-Madison School of Education’s new associate dean for innovation and partnerships, a position he is starting on Aug. 1. Halverson is a professor with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, and the director of the Wisconsin Collaborative Education Research Network (The Network) within the School of Education. In his new role, Halverson will lead plans to expand the School’s current office of Education Outreach and Partnerships into a larger, more comprehensive unit.
Tue
Jul
31
UW-Madison alumnus Mark Tauscher was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame earlier in July. Tauscher is a former Badger and Packer offensive lineman who graduated from UW-Madison in 1999 before going on to earn his master’s degree in educational administration from the School of Education in 2003. He also is a former member of the School of Education's Board of Visitors.
Mon
Jul
30
Graduate students Youmi Suk and Nana Kim from the UW-Madison School of Education's Department of Educational Psychology earned poster prizes at the International Meeting of the Psychometric Society. IMPS was hosted by Columbia University in New York from July 9 to 13. The Psychometric Society is a professional society devoted to the advancement of quantitative measurement practices in psychology, education and the social sciences. Its annual meetings draw over 500 attendees from around the world. The UW-Madison graduate students won two of the three awarded prizes, out of a total of 112 posters.
Fri
Jul
27
A recent Madison Magazine article features UW-Madison's Aaron Bird Bear and his work with the First Nations Heritage Tour. Bird Bear developed the First Nations Heritage Tour to promote understanding of the history of Madison's landscapes and address major racial equity issues, Madison Magazine reports. Bird Bear is the School of Education’s assistant dean for student diversity programs.
Fri
Jul
27
Wisconsin Life recently featured UW-Madison alumna J Matzner and her career working to make ballet accessible to people with mobility challenges. Matzner earned an undergraduate degree from the School of Education’s Dance Department in May 2013. The Wisconsin Life story centers around one of Matzner's students, Mari Koopman, who is in a wheelchair.
Thu
Jul
26
The Capital Times recently published an article about UW-Madison alumna and actor Carrie Coon, who returned to Wisconsin's American Players Theatre (APT). Coon received her master of fine arts degree from the Department of Theatre and Drama, which today is housed within the School of Education.
Wed
Jul
25
Four finalists to become the UW-Madison School of Education’s Associate Dean for Student Academic Affairs will present public presentations and take part in question-and-answer sessions as part of the interview process. The Associate Dean for Student Academic Affairs has general oversight and responsibility for student academic affairs and student services units and activities in the School of Education. This person will establish directions, develop policies and procedures, and facilitate coordination and integration among units providing services related to undergraduate dean’s office work, advising, student recruitment, program admission, scholarships and fellowships, and career services.
Wed
Jul
25
Using a new skills index based on federal data, a study out of UW-Madison's Wisconsin Center for Education Research finds significantly fewer “middle-skill” jobs exist in the United States than previously estimated. The report finds that only 16 percent of all jobs require training beyond high school but less than a bachelor’s degree, compared to previous estimates of one-third to more than one-half of total employment.
Wed
Jul
25
Isthmus recently reviewed "Little Shop of Horrors," a production from the UW-Madison School of Education's Department of Theatre and Drama. The story is famous for its cartoonish world of solid archetype characters and the crazy, strange man-eating plant that takes over a flower shop. In the review, Isthmus touches on the well-cast main characters and the ambitious set, and calls it a "charming" performance. "Directed and choreographed by visiting professor Shad Willingham, with music direction by Erin McConnell, it is an impressive take on a campy, horticultural horror story," Gwendolyn Rice reports ​for the Isthmus.
Tue
Jul
24
An article from Men's Health about the dangers of football for young players' brains quotes UW-Madison's Julie Stamm, an associate lecturer with the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology. A 2017 study coauthored by Stamm in Translational Psychiatry found that "people who started playing tackle football before age 12 doubled their risk of having behavioral problems and cognitive impairment, and tripled their risk of suffering from depression later in life. The increased risks did not change based on how many years they had played, the number of concussions they had, or whether they played through high school, college, or the pros," the Men's Health article explained.

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