School of Education News

Fri
May
04
Four talented undergraduates from UW-Madison were recently recognized during the American Physiological Society’s Experimental Biology meeting in San Diego. Alexandra Carl, Karly Katchen, Rachel Harradine and Caitlin Jarrard each were 2018 Barbara A. Horwitz and John M. Horowitz Outstanding Undergraduate Abstract Awardees. These awards are presented annually to undergraduate students presenting their research at the April 21-25 Experimental Biology event. Carl, Katchen and Jarrard also were awarded the Excellence in Undergraduate Research Awards based on their oral presentations.
Fri
May
04
Research from UW-Madison's Nick Hillman was cited by the St. Louis NAACP about performance-based public funding for universities in Missouri. The St. Louis NAACP said in a news release that Missouri is underfunding its two historically black institutions, Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis and Lincoln University in Jefferson City. In his research cited by the NAACP, Hillman reported that the Missouri universities that have seen the lowest budgetary gains over the last 40 years are the universities with higher percentages of black students and students receiving financial need-based Pell Grants.
Fri
May
04
UW-Madison alumna Margery Amdur will serve as a visiting resident artist at the University of Latvia and lead a student workshop titled "Making Meaning." Amdur earned her master of fine arts degree from the School of Education’s Art Department in 1982. She is currently a professor of art at Rutgers University–Camden. Over the course of the non-media specific workshop, students will challenge their sense of how and why they make art in the way they do, be encouraged to work beyond the scope of the workshop, and emphasize creative risk-taking.
Thu
May
03
UW-Madison’s Walter Stern has spent most of his academic career focusing on the historical intersection of race and education in the urban United States. And in May his new book, “Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City, 1764-1960,” was officially released. “I hope my historical work shines a light on how deeply rooted these disparities are and how they’ve been reinforced over long periods of time,” says Stern, whose research interests developed out of his experiences teaching public high school in Mississippi, covering education for a daily newspaper in Georgia and working as a consultant for multiple education initiatives in Louisiana. “This look back helps us better understand just how bold new strategies will need to be in order to undo such an entrenched and unequal system.”
Thu
May
03
A film from UW-Madison's Kate Corby, "Hungars Beach," was shown at two dance film festivals during the past two months. Corby is an associate professor with the School of Education's Dance Department. “Hungars Beach” is about a woman suffering the loss of her brother. On March 25, there was a screening of "Hungars Beach" ​during the 2018 Tiny Dance Film Festival in San Francisco, California. On April 19, "Hungars Beach" was shown as part of the 2018 Jacksonville Dance Film Festival in Jacksonville, Florida.
Wed
May
02
The Phi Kappa Phi, Chapter 021 at ​UW-Madison, has inducted 142 students into membership at its 98th Phi Kappa Phi Induction Ceremony. The ceremony was held on April 22 in Tripp Commons, Memorial Union. The keynote speaker was David Danaher, professor of Slavic studies in the Department of German, Nordic and Slavic. Honorary membership was granted to three UW-Madison Professors, including the School of Education's Nicholas Hillman. In addition, graduate students Jessie Nixon and Giselle Martinez Negeette received Zillman Summer Research Fellowships.
Wed
May
02
UW-Madison alumna Melanie Gehrke's craft kit business, The Mad Makery, was featured by Madison Magazine. Gehrke earned her bachelor's degree in Art Education from the UW-Madison School of Education in 2008. The Mad Makery helps give other people a sense of accomplishment through do-it-yourself craft kits that Gehrke makes herself. “I think especially in today’s age, everything is so digital and online,” she says. “I think for a lot of people (working with your hands) takes you kind of outside of yourself for a moment,” Gehrke told Madison Magazine. “You’re not worried about everything else that’s going on in your life.”
Tue
May
01
The student organization Diverse-OT was awarded the 2018 Bucky Award for the "Best New Student Organization." The Occupational Therapy program is housed within the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology. The award is given to a student organization that was founded within the last three years, and awarded due to member participation, its successes, and the contributions it has brought to campus and the surrounding community.
Tue
May
01
UW-Madison's Matthew Hora recently received a $10,000 grant from Tianjin University in eastern China that will support him through a month-long visit to study college internships early next fall. Hora will conduct the "College Internship Study," which recently launched in three U.S. institutions, in two Chinese colleges. The study includes an online survey of seniors about whether or not they’ve taken an internship and, if so, specific aspects of its design.
Tue
May
01
UW-Madison's Joseph Koykkar's multiple musical compositions have been performed across the Midwest this spring. Koykkar is a composer and professor with the School of Education's Dance Department.
Mon
Apr
30
The UW-Madison Dance Department and the UW-Madison Community Arts Collaboratory present the Performing Ourselves Spring Showcase "Better Together" on May 5. The event will feature approximately 125 youth from schools and community centers across Madison who, through their choreography, will illustrate what it means to be connected and “better together” as a group. The program, which is co-directed by ​UW-Madison's Kate Corby, an associate professor with the School of Education's Dance Department, and Mariah LeFeber, has provided a series of experiential movement and performance classes to over 250 underserved local youth throughout the past year.
Mon
Apr
30
The work of UW-Madison's Marjorie Kreilick recently appeared in an article from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel titled, "State Office Building murals by pioneering feminist artist in jeopardy." Kreilick is a professor emeritus with the School of Education's Art Department. In 1959, Kreilick shared her vision for 10 murals that would hang in the Milwaukee State Office Building, and today they could possibly be in jeopardy because the state plans to sell the aging building to private developers.
Fri
Apr
27
UW-Madison's Kathryn Moeller recently appeared on Wisconsin Public Radio's "Central Time" to talk about her new book, "The Gender Effect: Capitalism, Feminism, and the Corporate Politics of Development.” In her book and the radio segment, Moeller analyzes the the trend of international corporations developing charitable programs and other philanthropic initiatives that aim to alleviate poverty for girls and women in developing countries. Sometimes, these programs do more harm than good.
Fri
Apr
27
The term STEM, adopted by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in 1998, has become increasingly familiar throughout the United States due to the thousands of programs launched to produce more science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals. But how successful are these programs? With no national systems in place to answer that question, the NSF asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) to develop indicators for monitoring undergraduate STEM education. Mark Connolly, an associate research scientist at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research in UW–Madison’s School of Education, was among the 15 academics who served on the committee tasked with creating the indicators.
Fri
Apr
27
UW-Madison's Collette Stewart and Liz Sexe will present the shared concert, "Crossing Between," on Saturday, April 28, at The Crossing. Stewart and Sexe are lecturers with the School of Education's Dance Department.
Thu
Apr
26
UW-Madison's Lynda Barry is one of the top five finalists for the 2017 National Cartoonists Society (NCS) Reuben Award for "Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year." Barry is an award-winning author and cartoonist with the School of Education's Art Department. She holds the Chazen Family Distinguished Chair in Art. Ballots were sent out to voting NCS members, and the Reuben Award will be presented to the winner at the 72nd Annual Reuben Awards dinner on May 26 in Philadelphia.
Thu
Apr
26
UW-Madison Professor Emeritus Ken Zeichner is receiving an honorary degree from Syracuse University. Zeichner was a faculty member in the School of Education for 33 years and served as an associate dean for nine years. A news release from Syracuse University detailed Zeichner's accomplishments, research and his standing as a mentor, teacher, influential scholar and a strong advocate for K-12 public education while still offering insightful critique for improvement. Zeichner today is the Boeing Professor of Teacher Education at the University Washington in Seattle.
Wed
Apr
25
UW-Madison's Melinda Leko was awarded the editorship of the Teacher Education and Special Education (TESE) journal. Leko is an associate professor with the School of Education's Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. Cynthia Griffin from the University of Florida was also awarded the editorship. Leko and Griffin's term begins in 2019.
Wed
Apr
25
UW-Madison's Jerlando Jackson co-founded a research course at the American Educational Research Association's (AERA) annual meeting more than a decade ago that allows graduate students and early career scholars to spend a day working with established researchers on questions and methods that inform studies and help uplift African-Americans in education. “Each year, we go through great lengths to structure the course to target potential pitfalls and content likely omitted from their formal doctoral program and department-based mentoring,” Jackson says in a story about the class that was published by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education.
Tue
Apr
24
UW-Madison's Aydin Bal delivered a keynote at the 2nd International Congress on Early Childhood Intervention in Antalya, Turkey, on March 31. Bal is an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. Bal presented culturally responsive, school-wide behavioral intervention and support models to educators, psychologists, rehabilitation counselors, social workers, physiotherapists and researchers. He also presented his research on the implementation of Learning Labs in Wisconsin to facilitate equity-oriented partnerships between schools, communities and universities for systemic transformation.

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