Research News

Thu
Jun
21
The Wisconsin Institute for Science Education and Community Engagement (WISCIENCE) at UW–Madison has been awarded $1 million over five years by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to develop stronger support systems for transfer students studying science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, fields. Janet Branchaw, director of WISCIENCE and a faculty member with the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology, will lead a multi-institutional team of faculty and staff at UW–Madison, Madison College, UW–Whitewater and the UW System’s two-year institutions to develop, implement and evaluate a model transfer program.
Thu
Jun
21
UW-Madison's Mitchell Nathan was recently appointed as a Vilas Distinguished Achievement professor. Nathan is a highly-regarded faculty member with the School of Education's No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology. He also directs the Center on Education and Work. His research and teaching focuses on basic learning theory and research methods for understanding and improving instruction and student reasoning in mathematics, engineering and STEM more broadly.
Tue
Jun
19
UW-Madison's Rachel Dyer won second place for the Margaret Bernauer Psychology Research Award. Dyer is a master's degree student with the School of Education's Department of Counseling Psychology, under advisor Stephanie Budge. Dyer's research is titled, "Trans Youth Needs Assessment Survey Results: Nonmetropolitan-Metropolitan Differences in Perceived Safety at School for Wisconsin Trans and Non-binary Youth." Dyer co-authored the piece with Budge, Jay Botsford, Ben Andert, Jennifer Rehm and Brittany Allen.
Thu
Jun
14
The 2018 online edition of "The disAbility Advocate," an annual newsletter for alumni and friends of the School of Education's Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education, is now available. This year's cover story focuses on UW-Madison's Fong Chan, who grew up in a refugee settlement in Hong Kong before overcoming long odds to become one of the field of rehabilitation counseling's leading scholars.
Thu
Jun
14
UW-Madison’s Morgan Sinnard is the winner of the 2018 American Psychological Association’s Division 44 Transgender Research Award. ASA’s Division 44 is the Society for the Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity. Sinnard is a doctoral student with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology. Her work that is being recognized is titled, “Expanding the minority stress model: A meta-analysis of mental health among transgender compared to cisgender adults.”
Tue
Jun
12
UW-Madison's Jill Barnes is an invited speaker at the Campus Alberta Neuroscience 2018 International Conference in Banff, Alberta, Canada. Barnes is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology. The 2018 conference is titled, "Promoting Healthy Brain Aging and Preventing Dementia: Research and Translation." Barnes' research interests include the regulation of blood flow and blood pressure in humans, and how this changes with aging and exercise. ​She has published over 50 peer-review articles on these topics and oversees the Barnes Lab.
Thu
May
31
A team of UW-Madison researchers published a new article in the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine examining the attitudes and beliefs of young athletes who specialize in one sport, including thoughts on whether or not such efforts are likely to lead to a college scholarship. The study indicates that most youth athletes surveyed for the report believe that specialization in a sport increases their performance and ability to make not only a college team, but also their high school squad. Highly specialized athletes were also more likely to believe that they will receive a college scholarship.
Tue
May
29
UW-Madison’s Aydin Bal is the lead author on a new research paper that presents the first formative intervention study in the United States that addresses racial disparities in discipline at a public high school. The article, which appears in the American Educational Research Journal (AERJ), is titled, “Culturally Responsive School Discipline: Implementing Learning Lab at a High School for Systemic Transformation.” The report is co-authored with Kemal Afacan and Halil Ibrahim Cakir, both of whom are pursuing doctorates at UW-Madison in special education.
Tue
May
29
Over the next two years, two research studies funded by UW-Madison’s Center for Research on College to Workforce Transitions (CCWT) will help reveal how two types of college students –- Latinx parents attending community college and undergraduate anthropology majors -– transition to work and life after college. “The goal of these awards is to support applied research that will create new knowledge about how college students experience their transitions from college to work,” states Matt Hora, CCWT director. Hora, a UW–Madison education research scientist and assistant professor, launched the center a year ago in the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, part of the university’s School of Education.
Thu
May
24
UW-Madison’s Nicholas Hillman and Daniel Corral authored a blog post that examines how minority serving institutions fare under performance-based funding policies that many states are turning to. Hillman is an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, and a faculty affiliate of the Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education (WISCAPE). Corral is a Ph.D. student with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis.
Wed
May
23
Learn what Madison Education Partnership (MEP) researchers discovered about excused and unexcused absences in Madison’s public schools. MEP is the research-practice partnership between the UW–Madison School of Education’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) and MMSD.
Thu
May
17
The National Academy of Education (NAEd) on May 17 announced the recipients of the 2018 NAEd/Spencer Postdoctoral and Dissertation Fellowships, and four scholars from UW-Madison are receiving support. Walter Stern, an assistant professor with the Department of Educational Policy Studies, is receiving a Postdoctoral Fellowship, while Ph.D. students Gwen Baxley, Giselle Martinez Negrette and Stacy Priniski ​are being awarded Dissertation Fellowships. These prestigious fellowships provide funding and professional development to early-career researchers whose projects address critical issues in the history, theory or practice of formal or informal education, at the national and international levels.
Thu
May
17
UW-Madison’s Mitchell Nathan and Sadhana Puntambekar each were recently elected as a Fellow of the International Society of Learning Sciences (ISLS). Both are faculty members with the School of Education’s No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology, and the honor is in recognition of their “substantial contributions to the learning sciences.”
Fri
May
04
Four talented undergraduates from UW-Madison were recently recognized during the American Physiological Society’s Experimental Biology meeting in San Diego. Alexandra Carl, Karly Katchen, Rachel Harradine and Caitlin Jarrard each were 2018 Barbara A. Horwitz and John M. Horowitz Outstanding Undergraduate Abstract Awardees. These awards are presented annually to undergraduate students presenting their research at the April 21-25 Experimental Biology event. Carl, Katchen and Jarrard also were awarded the Excellence in Undergraduate Research Awards based on their oral presentations.
Fri
May
04
Research from UW-Madison's Nick Hillman was cited by the St. Louis NAACP about performance-based public funding for universities in Missouri. The St. Louis NAACP said in a news release that Missouri is underfunding its two historically black institutions, Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis and Lincoln University in Jefferson City. In his research cited by the NAACP, Hillman reported that the Missouri universities that have seen the lowest budgetary gains over the last 40 years are the universities with higher percentages of black students and students receiving financial need-based Pell Grants.
Thu
May
03
UW-Madison’s Walter Stern has spent most of his academic career focusing on the historical intersection of race and education in the urban United States. And in May his new book, “Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City, 1764-1960,” was officially released. “I hope my historical work shines a light on how deeply rooted these disparities are and how they’ve been reinforced over long periods of time,” says Stern, whose research interests developed out of his experiences teaching public high school in Mississippi, covering education for a daily newspaper in Georgia and working as a consultant for multiple education initiatives in Louisiana. “This look back helps us better understand just how bold new strategies will need to be in order to undo such an entrenched and unequal system.”
Tue
May
01
UW-Madison's Matthew Hora recently received a $10,000 grant from Tianjin University in eastern China that will support him through a month-long visit to study college internships early next fall. Hora will conduct the "College Internship Study," which recently launched in three U.S. institutions, in two Chinese colleges. The study includes an online survey of seniors about whether or not they’ve taken an internship and, if so, specific aspects of its design.
Fri
Apr
27
The term STEM, adopted by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in 1998, has become increasingly familiar throughout the United States due to the thousands of programs launched to produce more science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals. But how successful are these programs? With no national systems in place to answer that question, the NSF asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) to develop indicators for monitoring undergraduate STEM education. Mark Connolly, an associate research scientist at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research in UW–Madison’s School of Education, was among the 15 academics who served on the committee tasked with creating the indicators.
Tue
Apr
24
UW-Madison's Aydin Bal delivered a keynote at the 2nd International Congress on Early Childhood Intervention in Antalya, Turkey, on March 31. Bal is an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. Bal presented culturally responsive, school-wide behavioral intervention and support models to educators, psychologists, rehabilitation counselors, social workers, physiotherapists and researchers. He also presented his research on the implementation of Learning Labs in Wisconsin to facilitate equity-oriented partnerships between schools, communities and universities for systemic transformation.
Tue
Apr
24
UW-Madison's David Bell will be featured on a Capital Times-sponsored panel on May 8 titled "Should high schools be in the sports business?" Bell is an assistant professor with the Department of Kinesiology’s Athletic Training Program and the director of the Wisconsin Injury in Sport Laboratory (WISL). The Department of Kinesiology is housed within the School of Education. The panel will explore questions of high school sports as a focus of community life in Wisconsin, and how that role has changed in "an era of elite club teams, brain injury concerns and education reform."