Research News

Thu
Jan
16
UW-Madison’s Nicole Louie is receiving the Early Career Publication Award from the American Educational Research Association’s (AERA) Research in Mathematics Education Special Interest Group (SIG). Louie, an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction, is being honored for her 2018 paper, “Culture and ideology in mathematics teacher noticing,” published in the journal Educational Studies in Mathematics.
Thu
Jan
16
The latest edition of Learning Connections, a news magazine from UW–Madison's School of Education, is now available online. The ​Winter 2019-20 issue is filled with exciting news about School of Education faculty, staff, students, and alumni. This edition puts the spotlight on the School's new Global Engagement Office and some of our efforts to think, partner, and innovate across the world.
Wed
Jan
15
The UK-based Journal of Education and Work recently published a paper from UW-Madison's Matt Hora, Emily Parrott, and Pa Her that examines how students conceptualize internships. The authors report that representations of internship programs were often inconsistent with student accounts of those programs. They also found that students frequently used utilitarian terms, such as "learning' or "connections," when discussing internships.
Sat
Jan
11
UW-Madison’s Matt Hirshberg is the lead author on a new paper published in the journal Learning and Instruction that examines the merits of incorporating mindfulness training into preservice teacher education, and how such efforts can lead to improvements in the classroom. Hirshberg is a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at the university’s Center for Healthy Minds. He is an alumnus of the School of Education, earning his Ph.D. from the Department of Educational Psychology.
Mon
Jan
06
Courtney Bell will become the next director of the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER), UW–Madison School of Education Dean Diana Hess announced Monday, Jan. 6. Bell, who is currently a principal research scientist with Educational Testing Service (ETS), the world’s largest private, nonprofit educational testing and assessment organization, will begin her new position July 1.
Mon
Jan
06
UW–Madison’s Noah Feinstein is the lead author on a new article published in the journal Climate Policy that explains how education can play an important role in helping society adapt to a changing climate. Feinstein is an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction. The co-author on the report is K.J. Mach from the University of Miami.
Mon
Dec
30
A book from UW–Madison’s John Rudolph was selected as a Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2019. Rudolph’s book is titled, “How We Teach Science: What’s Changed, and Why It Matters,” which was published by Harvard University Press. Rudolph, a professor and chair of the School of Education’s highly regarded Department of Curriculum and Instruction, is an expert on the history of science education in American schools.
Fri
Nov
29
A new research project focused on the experience of undergraduate military service members and veterans enrolled in Wisconsin universities has recently been launched at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER), part of UW-Madison’s School of Education. The Veteran Education to Workforce Affinity and Success Study (VETWAYS), a three-year, $556,000 project funded by the National Science Foundation, will seek to better understand the unique social experiences and challenges this student population encounters as they progress through college and into the workforce.
Tue
Nov
26
A critical intersection exists between education and health, according to a consensus of researchers and evaluators from UW–Madison who have been working closely with rural schools, the community-school model, and Native American communities in Wisconsin.
Thu
Nov
21
Tim Tansey, an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education, will serve as the principal investigator (PI) on the UW-Madison sub-awards for two major new grant-funded projects. Virginia Commonwealth University Professor Paul Wehman is the PI on the two five-year, $4.4 million awards (total funding of $8.8 million) from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research in the U.S Department of Health and Human Services.
Wed
Nov
20
UW−Madison will continue to play a leading role in the second and final phase of a sweeping federal investment in better research mentoring, with responsibility for two major grants in the $43 million follow-up push to boost diversity of students, staff and faculty researchers in the biomedical sciences.
Thu
Nov
14
A talk on assessment and equity held on Oct. 30 with the University of Colorado-Boulder’s Lorrie Shepard is now available to view online. Shepard, the University Distinguished Professor and Dean Emerita with UC’s School of Education, researches psychometrics and the misuse of tests in educational settings. Her technical work has contributed to validity theory, standard setting, and statistical models for detecting test bias. Her lecture was titled, "When, If Ever, Can Assessment Foster Equity?"
Wed
Nov
13
A project led by UW-Madison's Stephen Quintana that's designed to strengthen mental health services for Madison’s Latinx community is receiving a $1 million grant over the next five years from the Wisconsin Partnership Program. The Community Impact Grant awarded to Centro Hispano of Dane County and its academic and community partners will advance the quality of accessible linguistically and culturally competent services that support the health of the local Latinx community.
Mon
Nov
04
UW-Madison’s Haley Vlach was selected to receive the American Psychological Association’s (APA) Boyd McCandless Award. This honor is a prestigious early career award in developmental psychology and human development. Vlach is an associate professor with the School of Education's Department of Educational Psychology, and is the director of the Learning, Cognition, and Development Lab.
Fri
Nov
01
Over the next five years, a team of early childhood educators and university evaluators, funded by a $1 million community impact grant from the Wisconsin Partnership Program at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, will train teachers, as well as document and evaluate Madison’s innovative One City Schools.
Thu
Oct
31
UW-Madison’s Mindi Thompson and the College of New Jersey’s Jason J. Dahling co-authored a report that was published in the flagship American Psychological Association journal’s special issue on poverty. Thompson is an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology and directs the Work and Wellness Lab.
Tue
Oct
22
A team of researchers from UW-Madison secured a $1.2 million grant to partner with the State of Wisconsin to examine a significant decline in the number of regulated early care and education (ECE) providers operating over the past 15 years. Leading this project is Amy Claessens, an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies and the associate director of the Center for Research on Early Childhood Education (CRECE).
Tue
Oct
22
UW-Madison’s Andrea Ruppar has been selected to receive the TASH 2019 Early Career Researcher Network Award. Ruppar is an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education (RPSE). Her scholarship focuses on building the capacity of schools and teachers to provide meaningful, evidence-based, inclusive education for students with the most significant disabilities —including multiple disabilities, intellectual disability, and autism. The TASH Early Career Researcher Network Award is focused on promoting the development and dissemination of evidence-based practices, and the support and mentorship of new researchers.
Mon
Oct
21
UW-Madison’s LaVar Charleston is a co-author on a new research study published by the Journal of Research Initiatives titled, “Black Male Persistence: A Phenomenological Collective of Familial and Social Motivators.” In the paper, the authors capture the voices of students who have persisted in higher education, highlighting student persistence and examining the critical components in social and environmental arrangements.
Fri
Oct
18
A new collaboration of Wisconsin and Minnesota education researchers formed to support education priorities in each state has won a five-year, $6.3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education. The project's goal is to improve the academic achievement of elementary and secondary school students in the two-state region by advancing the use of evidence-based practices. Researchers from each state’s flagship university, the University of Wisconsin−Madison and University of Minnesota, joined with Education Analytics, a Madison, Wisconsin-based education nonprofit, to develop the winning proposal.