Research News

Tue
Aug
14
UW-Madison’s Simon Goldberg was awarded the Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy’s 50th Anniversary Research Grant. The award provides $30,000 in funding and will support Goldberg’s research proposal, “Why do some therapists get better outcomes? Correlates of therapist effects in naturalistic psychotherapy.” Goldberg received his Ph.D. from the Department of Counseling Psychology in 2017 and is an incoming faculty member with the department.
Thu
Aug
02
A new Vialogues video features UW-Madison’s Maxine McKinney de Royston discussing an article she co-authored and that appeared in the Teachers College Record. McKinney de Royston is an assistant professor with the School of Education's Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Positive student-teacher relationships are known to benefit students' experiences in school and academic success, but positive student-teacher relationships are not the norm for African-American male students. In the article, McKinney de Royston researches what characterizes teacher-student relationships within all-black, all-male classrooms.
Wed
Aug
01
A report from Madison's CBS affiliate, WISC-TV/Ch. 3, features a study from UW-Madison's David Bell that explores how overspecialization in youth sports connects to daytime tiredness. Bell is an assistant professor with the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology. Bell's study explores the issues that are linked to focusing too much on one sport, otherwise known as overspecialization, including how overspecialized young athletes are much more likely to get tired during the day.
Tue
Jul
31
Rich Halverson was recently named the UW-Madison School of Education’s new associate dean for innovation and partnerships, a position he is starting on Aug. 1. Halverson is a professor with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, and the director of the Wisconsin Collaborative Education Research Network (The Network) within the School of Education. In his new role, Halverson will lead plans to expand the School’s current office of Education Outreach and Partnerships into a larger, more comprehensive unit.
Mon
Jul
30
Graduate students Youmi Suk and Nana Kim from the UW-Madison School of Education's Department of Educational Psychology earned poster prizes at the International Meeting of the Psychometric Society. IMPS was hosted by Columbia University in New York from July 9 to 13. The Psychometric Society is a professional society devoted to the advancement of quantitative measurement practices in psychology, education and the social sciences. Its annual meetings draw over 500 attendees from around the world. The UW-Madison graduate students won two of the three awarded prizes, out of a total of 112 posters.
Wed
Jul
25
Using a new skills index based on federal data, a study out of UW-Madison's Wisconsin Center for Education Research finds significantly fewer “middle-skill” jobs exist in the United States than previously estimated. The report finds that only 16 percent of all jobs require training beyond high school but less than a bachelor’s degree, compared to previous estimates of one-third to more than one-half of total employment.
Thu
Jul
19
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has selected Robert D. Mathieu, the Albert E. Whitford Professor of Astronomy at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, as an inaugural member of the STEM Education Advisory Panel. Mathieu, director of the university’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) and the associate dean for research at its School of Education, begins his first term on the national panel immediately and could serve up to three years.
Tue
Jul
17
UW-Madison's Rachel Dyer, Morgan Sinnard and Christopher Raines have received 2018 American Psychological Association (APA) Student Travel Awards. Dyer is a master's degree student, and Sinnard and Raines are Ph.D. students -- all with the School of Education's Department of Counseling Psychology. They received the awards to help with travel to the 2018 APA convention Aug. 9-12 in San Francisco to present their research.
Mon
Jul
16
UW-Madison's Rachelle Winkle-Wagner is the co-author of an article that was recently published in the Teachers College Record titled, "Finding a Voice in Predominantly White Institutions: A Longitudinal Study of Black Women Faculty Members’ Journeys Toward Tenure." Winkle-Wagner is a faculty member with the School of Education's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. She co-authored the article with Bridget Turner Kelly of the Loyola University at Chicago's School of Education.
Mon
Jul
09
This latest edition of Learning Connections, the UW-Madison School of Education's alumni news magazine, is now available online. The ​Summer 2018 issue is filled with exciting news about School of Education faculty, staff, students and alumni. In this edition, we put the focus on Leadership that Matters.
Thu
Jul
05
UW-Madison's Matt Hora is the lead author on a paper that was just published in the Community College Review titled, "Cultural Capital at Work: How Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills are Taught, Trained, and Rewarded in a Chinese Technical College." The paper is co-authored by Chelsea A. Blackburn Cohen, who received her Ph.D. from UW-Madison's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis earlier this year. Community and technical college student employability is an area of concern for the United States and China, and policy-makers focus on students' credentials and cognitive skills. The paper explores whether or not this focus on "completion" overlooks the roles other factors may play in employability, such as noncognitive skills and contextual factors.
Mon
Jun
25
Several alumni of UW-Madison's School of Education ​contributed to a new book titled, "Navigating the Common Good in Teacher Education: Critical and International Perspectives." The book's co-editors are Nikola Hobbel, who received a Ph.D. from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in 2003, and Barbara Bales, who received a master's in 1998 and a Ph.D. in 2004 from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. The book also contains chapters from four others with ties to the School of Education: alumnus Julio Emilio Diniz-Pereira (Ph.D. 2004); alumna Rita Verma (Ph.D. 2004); alumnus Bekisizwe S. Ndimande (Ph.D. 2005); and an afterward by Kenneth M. Zeichner, a former UW-Madison Hoefs-Bascom Professor of Teacher Education and School of Education associate dean.
Thu
Jun
21
The Wisconsin Institute for Science Education and Community Engagement (WISCIENCE) at UW–Madison has been awarded $1 million over five years by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to develop stronger support systems for transfer students studying science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, fields. Janet Branchaw, director of WISCIENCE and a faculty member with the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology, will lead a multi-institutional team of faculty and staff at UW–Madison, Madison College, UW–Whitewater and the UW System’s two-year institutions to develop, implement and evaluate a model transfer program.
Thu
Jun
21
UW-Madison's Mitchell Nathan was recently appointed as a Vilas Distinguished Achievement professor. Nathan is a highly-regarded faculty member with the School of Education's No. 1-ranked Department of Educational Psychology. He also directs the Center on Education and Work. His research and teaching focuses on basic learning theory and research methods for understanding and improving instruction and student reasoning in mathematics, engineering and STEM more broadly.
Tue
Jun
19
UW-Madison's Rachel Dyer won second place for the Margaret Bernauer Psychology Research Award. Dyer is a master's degree student with the School of Education's Department of Counseling Psychology, under advisor Stephanie Budge. Dyer's research is titled, "Trans Youth Needs Assessment Survey Results: Nonmetropolitan-Metropolitan Differences in Perceived Safety at School for Wisconsin Trans and Non-binary Youth." Dyer co-authored the piece with Budge, Jay Botsford, Ben Andert, Jennifer Rehm and Brittany Allen.
Thu
Jun
14
The 2018 online edition of "The disAbility Advocate," an annual newsletter for alumni and friends of the School of Education's Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education, is now available. This year's cover story focuses on UW-Madison's Fong Chan, who grew up in a refugee settlement in Hong Kong before overcoming long odds to become one of the field of rehabilitation counseling's leading scholars.
Thu
Jun
14
UW-Madison’s Morgan Sinnard is the winner of the 2018 American Psychological Association’s Division 44 Transgender Research Award. ASA’s Division 44 is the Society for the Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity. Sinnard is a doctoral student with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology. Her work that is being recognized is titled, “Expanding the minority stress model: A meta-analysis of mental health among transgender compared to cisgender adults.”
Tue
Jun
12
UW-Madison's Jill Barnes is an invited speaker at the Campus Alberta Neuroscience 2018 International Conference in Banff, Alberta, Canada. Barnes is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology. The 2018 conference is titled, "Promoting Healthy Brain Aging and Preventing Dementia: Research and Translation." Barnes' research interests include the regulation of blood flow and blood pressure in humans, and how this changes with aging and exercise. ​She has published over 50 peer-review articles on these topics and oversees the Barnes Lab.
Thu
May
31
A team of UW-Madison researchers published a new article in the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine examining the attitudes and beliefs of young athletes who specialize in one sport, including thoughts on whether or not such efforts are likely to lead to a college scholarship. The study indicates that most youth athletes surveyed for the report believe that specialization in a sport increases their performance and ability to make not only a college team, but also their high school squad. Highly specialized athletes were also more likely to believe that they will receive a college scholarship.
Tue
May
29
UW-Madison’s Aydin Bal is the lead author on a new research paper that presents the first formative intervention study in the United States that addresses racial disparities in discipline at a public high school. The article, which appears in the American Educational Research Journal (AERJ), is titled, “Culturally Responsive School Discipline: Implementing Learning Lab at a High School for Systemic Transformation.” The report is co-authored with Kemal Afacan and Halil Ibrahim Cakir, both of whom are pursuing doctorates at UW-Madison in special education.