School of Education News

Thu
Mar
21
A publication from UW-Madison alumni Katherine Palaces Narita and Suzanne Kaufman — “100 Bugs! A Counting Book” — was named a 2019 Mathical Honor Book. Narita, who authored the book, earned her master’s degree from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in 1997, after earning her bachelor’s degree in Spanish and sociology in 1995. Kaufman, who illustrated the book, earned her undergraduate degree from the School of Education’s Art Department in 1994.
Tue
Mar
19
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel recently reported on how smaller class sizes can benefit students of color, with the article featuring the insight of UW-Madison’s Elizabeth Graue, the Sorenson Professor with the School of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction, and the director of the Center for Research on Early Childhood Education (CRECE). Graue notes that the costs associated with implementing smaller class sizes can be significant.
Mon
Mar
18
UW-Madison’s Simon Goldberg is the lead author on a new paper examining treatment delay among post-9/11 veterans vs. pre-9/11 veterans and civilians. This work was published by the journal Psychiatric Services Today. Goldberg is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology, and he is an affiliate with the university’s Center for Healthy Minds.
Mon
Mar
18
UW-Madison alumna Miriam Thangaraj is this year's recipient of the Gail P. Kelly Dissertation Award from the Comparative and International Education Society. Thangaraj earned her Ph.D. from the School of Education's Department of Educational Policy Studies in 2018. Thangaraj's dissertation examines global policy efforts to combat child labor on the historical silk hand-looms of Kanchipuram, India, by moving children off of the looms and into schools.
Fri
Mar
15
Five women were honored with UW–Madison’s Outstanding Women of Color awards in a ceremony at the Pyle Center on March 5, including the School of Education's Bianca Baldridge.
Fri
Mar
15
The Wisconsin State Journal recently posted an article detailing UW-Madison alumna Carolyn Stanford Taylor’s journey to becoming Wisconsin’s state superintendent of public instruction. Stanford Taylor earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and a master’s degree in educational administration with the School of Education. The State Journal reports that Stanford Taylor’s experience of desegregation growing up in the south inspired her to a career in education, stating that it has driven her desire to create equitable learning environments for children.
Thu
Mar
14
UW-Madison’s Julie Mead recently co-authored a report with the University of Connecticut's Preston Green titled, “Advancing Intentional Equity in Charter Schools.” Mead is the School of Education’s association dean for education and is a professor with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. Charter schools, first implemented in the 1990s, have grown to account for 6 percent of the total number of students enrolled in public schools across the country.
Thu
Mar
14
UW-Madison professor Jin-Wen Yu is receiving the Hilldale Award in the Arts and Humanities for the 2018-19 academic year. Given annually on the UW-Madison campus since 1986-87, the Hilldale Awards recognize distinguished contributions to teaching, research, and service. One faculty member is honored in each division. Yu, who is a faculty member with the School of Education’s Dance Department, will be honored at a ceremony on May 6.
Wed
Mar
13
NBC recently posted an article that features research conducted by the Cooperative Children’s Book Center (CCBC), which is housed within the UW–Madison School of Education. The CCBC publishes an annual report tracking the number of children’s books by and about people of color and from First/Native Nations. The center started tracking these numbers in 1985. “This year for the first time, we are seeing an increase in the number of books about African-Americans and Latinos that are actually being created by authors and illustrators from those two groups,” KT Horning tells NBC.
Wed
Mar
13
UW-Madison alumna Kathryn Kirchgasler is receiving honorable mention recognition from the American Educational Research Association’s Division B (curricular studies), in that group’s Outstanding Dissertation Award competition. Kirchgasler earned her Ph.D. from the School of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction in 2018. The dissertation being recognized is titled, “Tracking Disparities: How Schools Make Up Scientific Americans and Pathologized Others.”
Tue
Mar
12
U.S. News and World Report released its 2020 Best Education Graduate Schools rankings on March 12, and UW-Madison is home to the highest-rated public school of education in the nation, a distinction it is sharing this year with the University of California-Los Angeles. UW–Madison’s School of Education is No. 3 overall, trailing only Ivy League privates Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania. UW–Madison, UCLA, and Stanford University all tied for the No. 3 spot. In addition, UW–Madison’s School of Education is also home to nine specialty programs ranked among the top 10 in the nation — including the top-ranked program in rehabilitation counseling.
Mon
Mar
11
The School of Education’s Dance Department will be hosting the Regional High School Dance Festival from March 15 to 19, bringing more than 400 students, teachers, and recruiters to campus.
Fri
Mar
08
UW-Madison’s Walter Stern was recently featured in a report from Milwaukee’s NPR affiliate, WUWM-89.7 FM, which examined the end of Milwaukee’s Chapter 220 desegregation program. Stern is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies. ​He is a historian of education and the author of a 2018 book titled, “Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City, 1764-1960.”
Thu
Mar
07
UW-Madison alumna Edie Raether recently gave a TEDx talk on brain fitness for kids. In her presentation, she discusses setting goals for children and oneself, drawing on the new finding that people are able to alter DNA through their thoughts. Raether earned her undergraduate degree in occupational therapy from the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology in 1966.
Wed
Mar
06
The Wisconsin State Journal (WSJ) recently covered UW-Madison student Shasparay Lighteard’s work on leading the new Black Arts Matter Festival. Lighteard, an undergraduate student working towards a degree in African American studies and a degree from the School of Education’s Department of Theatre and Drama, took the initiative last May to create a festival that celebrated black voices in the arts.
Wed
Mar
06
Northern Illinois University (NIU) recently hired UW-Madison alumnus Thomas Hammock as its football coach, and he will work alongside fellow alumnus Sean Frazier, the Huskies’ athletic director. Hammock earned his master’s degree from the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis in 2005. Frazier earned a master’s from that same department in 2015. NIU is the only major college sports program in the country with black men in the key roles of head football coach, athletic director and head men's basketball coach.
Wed
Mar
06
UW-Madison students Bailey Seymour and Julianna Hom have been invited to represent the School of Education’s Dance Department, performing their work in the Dance Education Center’s company performance in Stevens Point, Wisconsin, on March 9.
Tue
Mar
05
The School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies is hosting its annual graduate student symposium on Friday, March 8.
Tue
Mar
05
The La Crosse Tribune recently ran a feature on UW-Madison alumna and children's book author Christine Gowey. She earned her undergraduate degree in physical education​ from the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology in 1978. With tragic beginnings, Gowey’s career as a children’s book author was born out of her son Jeremiah’s unexpected death. According to the La Crosse Tribune, she used the writing process to heal and share her experiences to help other people.
Tue
Mar
05
The latest Under the Law column ​for Kappan magazine from UW-Madison's Julie Underwood is headlined, “The legal balancing act over public school curriculum." Underwood is the Susan Engeleiter Professor of Education Law, Policy and Practice, and the former dean of the School of Education. She explains that the federal constitution has primacy, while each state has the authority to create and control school districts and define their standards and curriculum.

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