School of Education News

Thu
Aug
15
The Wisconsin State Journal recently posted an article about Travis Wiltjer, who will be playing football this year for the Badgers as a graduate student transfer. Wiltjer, the article notes, will be pursuing master’s degree work with UW–Madison’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis.
Wed
Aug
14
Time magazine recently interviewed UW-Madison’s Geoffrey Borman about his new study that indicates a brief and low-cost intervention done early in the school year can lead to higher grades, better attendance, and fewer behavioral problems for sixth graders embarking on their stressful first year of middle school. Borman is a Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis.
Tue
Aug
13
While observing heavy use of selfie apps such as Snapchat, UW-Madison graduate student Amy Niu found herself wondering about the effects that virtual makeovers have on college-age females. “I started to wonder how looking at a different self will change how people will view themselves,” said Niu, who is in the School of Education’s highly regarded Department of Educational Psychology.
Mon
Aug
12
The Atlanta Black Star recently utilized research conducted by UW–Madison’s Cooperative Children’s Book Center for a report headlined, “More Children’s Books Feature Animals Than Black People; Black Publishers Are Working to Change That.” The CCBC is housed within the UW-Madison School of Education. Since 1985 the CCBC has published an annual report tracking the number of children’s books by and about people of color and from First/Native Nations.
Fri
Aug
09
UW–Madison’s Nicholas Hillman recently appeared on WORT-FM’s “A Public Affair” program for a segment titled, “The Real Cost of College.” Hillman, an associate professor with the School of Education's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, helps listeners “get a full picture of the cost of attendance, the generational divide when it comes to college, proposed solutions at the university and federal levels, and the importance of higher education for aspiring students.”
Thu
Aug
08
UW-Madison alumna Abbe Herzig has been named the inaugural director of education in the Division of Government Relations of the American Mathematical Society (AMS). Herzig earned both her master’s (1999) and Ph.D. (2002) from the School of Education’s highly ranked Department of Curriculum and Instruction. According to this AMS news release, Herzig will oversee the AMS education portfolio, with a focus on undergraduate and graduate education in the mathematical sciences.
Wed
Aug
07
UW-Madison’s Malachy Bishop was featured in an interview from the University of Kentucky’s Human Development Institute (HDI). Bishop is the Norman L. and Barbara M. Berven Professor of Rehabilitation Psychology with the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. Bishop is also the former HDI director of research and development, holding that role from 2014 until 2018, when he took his current position at UW-Madison. Today, he still collaborates with HDI on some projects.
Wed
Aug
07
UW–Madison’s Michael Apple is receiving the 2018 Article of the Year Award from Educational Review. This honor is for his essay, “Rightist gains and critical scholarship,” which was published by the journal in January 2018. The award is selected by the national editorial board of the Educational Review. Apple, who is widely known for conducting groundbreaking work as one of the leading founders of the field of critical curriculum studies, is the John Bascom Professor Emeritus of Curriculum and Instruction, and Educational Policy Studies.
Tue
Aug
06
In Julie Underwood’s latest Under the Law column for Phi Delta Kappan magazine, she discusses three cases from the 2018-2019 Supreme Court term that have big implications for education. Underwood is UW–Madison's Susan Engeleiter Professor of Education Law, Policy, and Practice. The three cases — American Legion vs. American Humanist Association (2019), Kisor vs. Wilkie (2019), and Department of Commerce v. State of New York (2019) — also reveal deep divisions in the U.S. Supreme Court, according to Underwood.
Mon
Aug
05
UW–Madison’s Martina Rau recently received a federal grant to examine how instructors can better utilize visuals to help students learn complex engineering concepts. The award of $300,000 is from the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE) grant program. Rau is an associate professor with the School of Education’s highly regarded Department of Educational Psychology and the director of the Learning Representations and Technology Lab. She is partnering on this project with UW–Madison’s Barry Van Veen, the Lynn H. Matthias Professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.
Mon
Aug
05
UW-Madison’s Faisal Abdu’Allah is featured in “Get Up, Stand Up Now,” a major exhibition celebrating 50 years of black creativity in Britain and beyond. Abdu’Allah is an associate professor with the School of Education’s Art Department. He works mostly in printmaking and installation, often raising questions of race and identity in relation to issues of cultural diversity and multiculturalism. “Get Up, Stand Up Now” is on display through Sept. 15 at the Somereset House in London.
Fri
Aug
02
UW–Madison alumna Mercy Agyepong accepted a position as an assistant professor of sociology of education at New York University. Agyepong, who earned her Ph.D. from the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies this past spring, will begin serving as a faculty member at NYU in September 2019. Her research examines the ways in which school context impacts perceptions and understandings of “Blackness” and “Africanness” in unique ways, with her dissertation titled, “Blackness and Africanness: Black West African immigrant students’ experiences in two New York City high schools.”
Thu
Aug
01
UW-Madison’s Michael Apple is receiving yet another honorary degree, this time from University College Dublin in Ireland. Apple is the John Bascom Professor Emeritus of Curriculum and Instruction, and Educational Policy Studies. He will receive the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Education, honoris causa, on Dec. 2, 2019 at UCD’s O’Reilly Hall. This marks the 14th time Apple will be receiving an honorary degree, or the equivalent.
Thu
Aug
01
A team of researchers, many with ties to UW–Madison’s School of Education, collaborated on an article recently published in The Review of Higher Education titled, “Connecting Identity with Research: Socializing Students of Color Towards Seeing Themselves as Scholars.” The report notes: “Findings revealed that intentional bi-directional socialization processes that incorporated students' backgrounds into their academic pursuits positively contributed to students' development as scholars."
Wed
Jul
31
UW-Madison’s Anthony Hernandez was awarded a prestigious 2019 National Academy of Education (NAEd)/Spencer Foundation Research Development Award. The Ph.D. student with the Department of Educational Policy Studies has an abiding passion for improving educational opportunities for Latinx students.
Wed
Jul
31
UW-Madison alumnus Marc Kornblatt recently produced a music video for the song “I See You,” which was written in support of the National Alliance for Mental Health (NAMI). Kornblatt received his undergraduate degree in elementary education from UW-Madison’s School of Education in 2001. Kornblatt retired from the classroom following the 2014-15 academic year after a 16-year second career as a teacher. He now devotes his time to filmmaking.
Tue
Jul
30
Helping sixth graders see their concerns about measuring up in middle school as normal and temporary can boost grades and attendance, while reducing behavioral problems, a new study by UW–Madison researcher Geoffrey D. Borman shows. The brief, low-cost intervention, done early in the school year, also scales up easily for use by an entire school district.
Mon
Jul
29
Wisconsin Public Radio (WPR) shared a report that notes the work of UW-Madison's Julie Stamm and the Department of Kinesiology's efforts to better engage with students in large lectures. Started in 2016, the Redesigning for Active Learning in High-Enrollment Courses (REACH) initiative at UW–Madison is aimed at increasing engagement and attendance in large lecture classes. While some teachers are choosing not to implement REACH in their classrooms, Stamm, who is an associate lecturer with the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology, has embraced it in her human anatomy course that has several hundred students in it.
Fri
Jul
26
The Discussion Project is accepting applications for its various cohorts during the upcoming academic year. The idea behind the professional development series is that an engaging classroom discussion can be both a vital part of the learning process and a microcosm of the way we hope democracy functions. Yet a high-quality discussion doesn’t just happen — it takes structure, planning, practice, and skill to make it effective. The Discussion Project offers instructors tools to design and facilitate high-quality classroom discussions to prepare their students to participate in them.
Fri
Jul
26
UW-Madison’s Kelli Koltyn and Kevin Crombie recently participated in a symposium titled “Exercise and the Endocannabinoid System: Implications for Mental Health” at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in Orlando, Florida. Koltyn is a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology, while Crombie is a graduate student with the department.

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