Research News

Thu
Jun
20
A team of researchers from the School of Education's Department of Educational Psychology was recently awarded two grants to examine brief mental health interventions that are designed for use in schools. An overarching goal of these projects — which are funded via the U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES) — is to test strategies that schools can use to support students who are at risk for social-emotional and behavioral concerns.
Tue
Jun
18
A literacy and arts enrichment program for low-income children aged 2-18 in Madison is a force for good mainly because it creates a "safe place" for participants to take risks and learn to express themselves, according to program evaluation experts at UW-Madison.
Tue
Jun
18
In the world of K-12 English language proficiency assessment, a population of U.S. students is often overlooked, according to Laurene Christensen, a principal investigator at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research. Although federal law, requires each state to assess the English language proficiency of these underserved students, many states have never done so because they lack the knowledge and resources on how to go about it, she says.
Mon
Jun
17
The School of Education’s Grand Challenges initiative, which aims to ignite cross-disciplinary innovation, spent much of the 2018-19 academic year focusing on a new Seed Grants Competition. In late May, nine interdisciplinary teams were awarded $75,000 each to grow their ambitious ideas
Mon
Jun
17
Getting past the basic “yes” or “no” question on college internships — just asking whether a student did one or not — to get a deeper understanding of the “whys” and “what-ifs” around these on-the-job experiences is at the heart of a new working paper co-authored by UW–Madison's Matthew Hora, a research scientist with the School of Education’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER).
Fri
Jun
14
With the legitimacy of science increasingly under attack, UW–Madison’s John Rudolph has authored a new book that explains how and why we teach science in schools matters. Rudolph, who started his career as a middle and high school science teacher in Wisconsin, is a professor and chair of the School of Education’s highly regarded Department of Curriculum and Instruction. He is an expert on the history of science education in American schools.
Fri
Jun
14
UW-Madison’s Robert Enright has been invited to represent Division 3 (Society for Experimental Psychology and Cognitive Science) of the American Psychological Association (APA) at the annual Spielberger EMPathy Symposium on Aug. 9 in Chicago. Enright, a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Psychology and the founder of the International Forgiveness Institute, has been pioneering work on the science of forgiveness and researching how it affects wellbeing for more than three decades.
Thu
Jun
06
A new study from UW-Madison's Xueli Wang and Seo Young Lee examines the psychometric properties of a new survey measuring factors of STEM student transfers from two- to four-year colleges. This study was published in the Review of Higher Education.
Wed
Jun
05
UW-Madison’s Michael Apple has just published two new books — “Re-imagining Education for Democracy,” with Stuart Riddle, and “Critical Studies of Education in Asia: Knowledge, power, and the Politics of Curriculum Reforms,” with Leonel Lim. Both examine the limits and possibilities of creating more critically democratic educational policies and practices, and current national and international contexts.
Tue
Jun
04
UW-Madison's David Kaplan recently received an $800,000 grant from the Institute for Education Sciences (IES) to develop and adapt the method of Bayesian dynamic borrowing to large-scale assessment programs, such as the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) and the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA). The co-PI on the project is Jianshen Chen, who earned her Ph.D. from the Department of Educational Psychology’s quantitative methods program.
Mon
Jun
03
UW–Madison researchers, including several with ties to the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology, recently published a study on the effectiveness of activity trackers, including Fitbits, with JMIR Publications' mHealth and uHealth. Authors include Diana Dorn and Jessica Gorzelitz, who both are both graduate students with the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology, while Lisa Cadmus-Bertram, Kelli Koltyn and David Bell are faculty members with the department.
Fri
May
31
The National Academy of Education (NAEd) announced the recipients of the 2019 NAEd/Spencer Postdoctoral and Dissertation Fellowships, and this year three people with ties to UW-Madison’s School of Education are receiving these highly competitive awards. Matthew Hirshberg and Martina Rau were named NAEd/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellows, while Ashley Smith is receiving an NAEd/Spencer Dissertation Fellowship.
Fri
May
10
The Rural Education Research and Implementation Center aims to improve educational outcomes for rural students, families and schools through rigorous, partnership-based research. As co-directors Craig Albers and Andy Garbacz say, “Rural Wisconsin, we are listening.” The RERIC is holding a launch celebration on Monday, May 13, from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. on the 13th floor of the Educational Sciences building.
Wed
May
08
UW–Madison’s new Rural Education Research and Implementation Center (RERIC) is holding a launch celebration on Monday, May 13. RERIC is being led by co-directors Craig Albers and Andy Garbacz, both of whom are faculty members with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Psychology. The new center is housed within the School of Education’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER). The RERIC launch and celebration runs from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. on the 13th floor of the Educational Sciences building.
Fri
May
03
Courtney Luedke is an alumna of UW-Madison who earned her Ph.D. from the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis in 2014. She is an assistant professor and the interim coordinator of the higher education leadership program at UW–Whitewater.
Wed
May
01
Jamila Lee-Johnson is receiving her doctorate from the School of Education's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. During her time on campus, Lee-Johnson has co-authored a book and worked on research related to college access — specifically looking at the experiences of undergraduate black women in leadership positions at historically black colleges and universities. She also examined the graduate school socialization process for students of color. “I want to use my research to give a voice to those who have often been silenced,” she says.
Mon
Apr
29
The broadest study ever undertaken of long-term English learners (LTELs) in U.S. public schools underscores the need to better understand how students receive this classification, and why the size of the LTEL population varies widely across and within states. Since LTEL status may negatively impact future educational opportunities and outcomes, the study calls for a much closer examination of how students become classified as LTELs across the U.S.
Sun
Apr
28
UW-Madison researchers published a new paper in the American Educational Research Journal (AERJ) on how non-cognitive skills are defined, taught, and trained in four occupations. The study is titled, "Exploring the Situated and Cultural Aspects of Communication in the Professions: Implications for Teaching, Student Employability, and Equity in Higher Education." This report explains how skills, like communication, are defined and used is shaped by cultural, political, and situational factors.
Sat
Apr
27
A new article from WisContext headlined, “Why the educational dreams of refugees get put on the back burner,” features the research of UW-Madison’s Matthew Wolfgram and Isabella Vang from the Center for Research on College-Workforce Transitions (CCWT). Wolfgram is an anthropologist of education and a senior researcher at the CCWT, housed within the School of Education’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research. Vang also works with the CCWT, as an undergraduate research assistant.
Tue
Apr
23
Shiloah Coley, a junior at UW–Madison, has been named a Truman Scholar, one of the most prestigious undergraduate honors in the country. Coley intends to pursue a doctorate in sociology, researching the impact art programming, access to arts education, and public art practices have on low-income communities of color. She has enjoyed making art her whole life — drawing, painting, writing — and seeks a career that merges those skills with her love for community-based work.