Research News

Mon
Oct
07
UW-Madison’s Bianca Baldridge will be giving a book talk on her new work, “Reclaiming Community: Race and the Uncertain Future of Youth Work”, at the Wisconsin Book Festival on Oct. 18. Her presentation begins at 4:30 p.m. in Community Room 301 at Madison's Central Library. Baldridge, a sociologist of education and an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies, is a life-long youth worker and community-engaged scholar.
Wed
Oct
02
The new book, “Reclaiming Community: Race and the Uncertain Future of Youth Work,” from UW-Madison’s Bianca Baldridge is a 2019 American Educational Studies Association (AESA) Critics’ Choice Book Award winner. Baldridge is a sociologist of education and an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies.
Tue
Oct
01
Alongside lead author Wendy Wood of Colorado State University, UW-Madison’s Beth Fields recently co-authored a report that was featured in the journal Disability and Rehabilitation. Fields is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology. The report is titled, "Hippotherapy: a systematic mapping review of peer-reviewed research, 1980 to 2018."
Mon
Sep
30
The Center for Research on College-to-Workforce Transitions (CCWT) — a project at UW‒Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research — is collaborating with the United Negro College Fund’s Career Pathways Initiative and a vocational psychologist to study internship programs at six historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) that have a high population of STEM graduates.
Tue
Sep
24
UW-Madison’s Lesley Bartlett, along with colleagues from Brazil and South Africa, was recently awarded a grant from the International Network of Educational Institutes (INEI) to conduct a collaborative research project. Bartlett is a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies and is an anthropologist who works in international and comparative education. Her recent work takes up anthropological perspectives to examine literacy programs and pedagogies.
Mon
Sep
23
Everyone has heard they should “eat healthy and exercise” for better quality of life, and cancer survivors are no different. Cadmus-Bertram and Jess Gorzelitz opened a clinical trial to study the effects of a strength training program on endometrial cancer survivorship.
Fri
Sep
20
The 2019 International Colloquium on Black Males in Education (ICBME) is being held in downtown Milwaukee Nov. 6-8, with a pre-colloquium on Nov. 5. Each year, ICBME brings together top researchers, high-impact practitioners, funders, policymakers, students, and concerned citizens to engage in conversations regarding the state of affairs for black boys and men in education. The International Colloquium on Black Males in Education is sponsored by Wisconsin's Equity & Inclusion Laboratory (Wei LAB) at UW–Madison and the Todd Anthony Bell National Resource Center on the African American Male at Ohio State University.
Thu
Sep
12
UW-Madison’s Yeohyun Ahn recently delivered a presentation at TypeCon, an annual typography-focused convention that took place from Aug. 28 to Sept. 1 in Minneapolis. Ahn is an assistant professor of graphic design with the School of Education’s Art Department. Ahn's presentation, “TYPE+CODE III,” addressed the possibilities of an extension of the aesthetic of computational typography from cyberspace to physical space by using digital fabrication.
Tue
Sep
10
UW–Madison’s David Rosenthal will become president of the National Council on Rehabilitation Education (NCRE) in October. Rosenthal is a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.
Thu
Aug
29
With the release of the 2019 College Scorecard in May and the fall semester just days away, some again are asking, "Does higher education cost more than it’s worth?" And this time, graduate school debt is under scrutiny, as it offers a mixed bag of pros and cons tied to students’ race and family incomes. In a recent working paper and a forthcoming article in the journal Sociology of Education, sociologists Jaymes Pyne and Eric Grodsky argue that for the last 20 years a perfect storm has been brewing over those seeking graduate and professional degrees, especially African-American and low-income graduate students. Grodsky is a professor of sociology and education policy, and a researcher at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER), at UW–Madison. Pyne is an affiliated WCER researcher and postdoctoral research associate at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education.
Tue
Aug
27
UW-Madison's Yeohyun Ahn recently presented her new project, which focuses on isolation and marginalization in higher education, at the 2019 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ (IEEE) Games, Entertainment, and Media (GEM) Conference hosted by Yale University’s Center for Collaborative Arts and Media June 19-22. Ahn is an assistant professor of graphic design and interactive media with the School of Education's Art Department. Ahn's project, which is titled “Social Homelessness on U.S. Campuses,” brings together multidisciplinary art and design research to explore the isolation of Asian female faculty members in higher education.
Fri
Aug
23
UW-Madison alum David Perrodin is the author of a newly released book, “School of Errors: Rethinking school safety in America.” Perrodin earned his Ph.D. from the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis (ELPA) in 2016. A former school administrator, Perrodin challenges common school safety narratives in his new book. Perrodin tells the Portage Daily Register, “We’re not building systems that are accessible for kids. We’re just putting fortifications in.”
Tue
Aug
13
While observing heavy use of selfie apps such as Snapchat, UW-Madison graduate student Amy Niu found herself wondering about the effects that virtual makeovers have on college-age females. “I started to wonder how looking at a different self will change how people will view themselves,” said Niu, who is in the School of Education’s highly regarded Department of Educational Psychology.
Wed
Aug
07
UW–Madison’s Michael Apple is receiving the 2018 Article of the Year Award from Educational Review. This honor is for his essay, “Rightist gains and critical scholarship,” which was published by the journal in January 2018. The award is selected by the national editorial board of the Educational Review. Apple, who is widely known for conducting groundbreaking work as one of the leading founders of the field of critical curriculum studies, is the John Bascom Professor Emeritus of Curriculum and Instruction, and Educational Policy Studies.
Tue
Aug
06
In Julie Underwood’s latest Under the Law column for Phi Delta Kappan magazine, she discusses three cases from the 2018-2019 Supreme Court term that have big implications for education. Underwood is UW–Madison's Susan Engeleiter Professor of Education Law, Policy, and Practice. The three cases — American Legion vs. American Humanist Association (2019), Kisor vs. Wilkie (2019), and Department of Commerce v. State of New York (2019) — also reveal deep divisions in the U.S. Supreme Court, according to Underwood.
Fri
Aug
02
UW–Madison alumna Mercy Agyepong accepted a position as an assistant professor of sociology of education at New York University. Agyepong, who earned her Ph.D. from the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies this past spring, will begin serving as a faculty member at NYU in September 2019. Her research examines the ways in which school context impacts perceptions and understandings of “Blackness” and “Africanness” in unique ways, with her dissertation titled, “Blackness and Africanness: Black West African immigrant students’ experiences in two New York City high schools.”
Thu
Aug
01
A team of researchers, many with ties to UW–Madison’s School of Education, collaborated on an article recently published in The Review of Higher Education titled, “Connecting Identity with Research: Socializing Students of Color Towards Seeing Themselves as Scholars.” The report notes: “Findings revealed that intentional bi-directional socialization processes that incorporated students' backgrounds into their academic pursuits positively contributed to students' development as scholars."
Wed
Jul
31
UW-Madison’s Anthony Hernandez was awarded a prestigious 2019 National Academy of Education (NAEd)/Spencer Foundation Research Development Award. The Ph.D. student with the Department of Educational Policy Studies has an abiding passion for improving educational opportunities for Latinx students.
Tue
Jul
30
Helping sixth graders see their concerns about measuring up in middle school as normal and temporary can boost grades and attendance, while reducing behavioral problems, a new study by UW–Madison researcher Geoffrey D. Borman shows. The brief, low-cost intervention, done early in the school year, also scales up easily for use by an entire school district.
Fri
Jul
26
UW-Madison’s Kelli Koltyn and Kevin Crombie recently participated in a symposium titled “Exercise and the Endocannabinoid System: Implications for Mental Health” at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in Orlando, Florida. Koltyn is a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology, while Crombie is a graduate student with the department.