Research News

Tue
Jan
15
With 2019 now upon us, Kappan magazine recently took a look back at its most popular stories, as determined by readers, for the previous year. And in 2018, checking in at No. 2 is an Under the Law column from UW-Madison’s Julie Underwood titled, “School uniforms, dress codes, and free expression: What’s the balance?” The deck headline on this popular article, which appeared in the Feb. 26 issue, reads, “Requiring school uniforms may be less legally fraught than implementing a school dress code.” Underwood is the Susan Engeleiter Professor of Education Law, Policy and Practice, and the former dean of the School of Education.
Wed
Jan
09
Gary Orfield and UW-Madison’s Nick Hillman will be delivering a public book talk on Thursday, Jan. 24, to discuss their publication, “Accountability and Opportunity in Higher Education: The Civil Rights Dimension.” Released in March 2018 and co-edited by Orfield and Hillman, the book includes essays from top academics addressing the unforeseen impact of accountability standards on students of color and the institutions that disproportionately serve them. The book talk runs from 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. in the Education Building’s Wisconsin Idea room.
Tue
Jan
08
UW-Madison’s David Kaplan received a federal grant for a new project titled, “Utilizing State NAEP Data for Probabilistic Prediction and Forecasting: A Bayesian Approach.” The grant is from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Research and Development Program. Kaplan's newly funded project concerns the critically important problem of monitoring of trends in education outcomes over time.
Tue
Jan
08
A fourth edition of “Ideology and Curriculum,” written by UW-Madison's Michael Apple, is being released for its 40th anniversary. First published in 1979, this work has informed the relationship of cultural and economic power in education. It has become widely recognized for its ground-breaking statements, celebrated as one of the most significant education books during the 20th century. Apple has updated his renowned book, adding a full chapter as well as a new preface.
Thu
Dec
20
The School of Education’s Virginia Horne Henry Fund for Women’s Physical Education, Movement and the Female Body in Culture is now accepting project proposals and applications for the Distinguished Graduate Fellowships. All UW-Madison faculty, staff and student organizations are welcome to apply. The deadline for proposals is Feb. 1, 2019 at 4:30 p.m.
Tue
Dec
18
UW-Madison's Julie Mead has co-authored a policy brief titled, “How School Privatization Opens the Door for Discrimination,” which analyzes discrimination in an era of education privatization. Mead is the School of Education’s associate dean for education and is a professor with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. The brief, co-authored with Indiana University's Susan Eckes, was published through the National Education Policy Center (NEPC).
Fri
Dec
14
A professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (SMPH) and in the Department of Kinesiology at the UW-Madison School of Education, Farrar Edwards has focused her research on investigating the cultural, physical, genetic and lifestyle factors that lead to a wide range of health conditions that have disparate effects on different populations. Her current investigations have the goal of advancing health equity by addressing health disparities, particularly focusing on Alzheimer’s disease and stroke in African American populations. She has contributed to significant advances in the care of minority, immigrant and tribal communities in Wisconsin, but says there’s a long way to go. This is among the reasons she advocated for UW-Madison to engage in the All of Us Research Program.
Thu
Dec
13
In her most recent column of Under the Law for Phi Delta Kappan magazine, a professional journal for educators, Julie Underwood discusses marginal decisions in the US Supreme Court that changed the direction of education policy and practice. By describing these 5-4 landmark education cases, “each hinged on just one vote,” Underwood hopes to display the significance of every vote and opinion, especially in the Supreme Court.
Tue
Dec
11
The journal Brain Plasticity recently published a new paper from UW-Madison’s Jill Barnes and Adam Corkery titled, “Exercise Improves Vascular Function, but does this Translate to the Brain?” Their research examines how cerebrovascular function facilitates the connection between exercise and cognition, specifically applying this to Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia.
Mon
Dec
10
The latest edition of Learning Connections, a news magazine published twice a year for alumni and friends of the UW-Madison School of Education, is now available online. The ​Fall 2018 issue is filled with exciting news about School of Education faculty, staff, students and alumni. The theme for this latest issue is impact. By tapping into its talents and expertise, the School is involved in a range of initiatives across the arts, health and education that are designed to positively impact our community — and our world.
Fri
Dec
07
UW-Madison’s Matthew Hora and his colleagues Ross Benbow and Bailey Smolarek recently had a report critiquing the idea of soft skills published in Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning. Hora is an assistant professor of adult and higher education in the Department of Liberal Arts and Applied Studies, and is an affiliate with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. Hora is also a research scientist with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER), and the director of UW-Madison’s Center for College-Workforce Transitions (CCWT), which is housed within WCER.
Thu
Dec
06
John Baldacchino, the director of UW-Madison’s Division of the Arts and a professor with the School of Education’s ​art education program, will be publishing his new book, “Art as Unlearning: Towards a Mannerist Pedagogy,” on Dec. 13. In this book, Baldacchino pushes past traditional art education aspects.
Fri
Nov
30
UW-Madison’s David Bell, an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology and director of the Wisconsin Injury in Sport Laboratory, recently wrote a guest editorial for the journal Athletic Training and Sports Health Care. His column is headlined, "Youth Sports Injuries and Sports Specialization."
Thu
Nov
29
The most recent edition of Social Education — the flagship, peer-reviewed journal of the National Council for the Social Studies — includes a special section on teaching controversial issues that was guest edited by UW-Madison’s Diana Hess. Hess is dean of the School of Education and holds the Karen A. Falk Distinguished Chair of Education. Not only has Hess researched and examined how controversial discussions surrounding politics and constitutional issues happen, she has also written a recent award-winning book on the subject, “The Political Classroom: Evidence and Ethics and Democratic Education,” co-authored with Paula McAvoy.
Thu
Nov
29
UW-Madison Associate Professor Rachelle Winkle-Wagner and two graduate students collaborated and published a new, path-breaking book that explores how researchers and scholars can translate their work to reach a more diverse audience in a way that promotes equality. Winkle-Wagner collaborated with Jamila Lee-Johnson and Ashley Gaskew to edit, “Critical Theory and Qualitative Data Analysis in Education.” Their work explains how critical theories can inform research processes, like data collection and interpretation, in qualitative research and analysis.
Mon
Nov
26
Research by UW-Madison's Ross Benbow and Changhee Lee was recently published by the academic journal, Higher Education. Benbow is an associate researcher with the School of Education’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) and Lee is a doctoral student with School's Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. The paper is titled, "Teaching-focused social networks among college faculty: exploring conditions for the development of social capital."
Tue
Nov
20
Student athletes who attended high schools with a low availability of athletic trainers (AT) — mostly in rural and inner-city areas — are 50 percent more likely to have a sports-related concussion (SRC) that goes un-identified, un-assessed or mismanaged, according to a new study published in the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) Journal of Athletic Training. The lead author on the paper is UW-Madison’s Timothy McGuine, who earned his master’s degree from the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology in 1986 and a Ph.D. in 2005 in continuing and vocational education.
Fri
Nov
09
UW-Madison’s Michael Apple recently delivered two presentations in Europe. Apple is the John Bascom Professor Emeritus of Curriculum and Instruction, and Educational Policy Studies. Apple delivered the Sara Fielden Memorial Lecture on “The Challenges of Critical Education” at the University of Manchester in England. He then went on to give the Studia Generalia Lecture on “The Challenges of Critical Education” at The University of the Arts in Helsinki, Finland.
Tue
Nov
06
UW-Madison’s Kimber Wilkerson and Melinda Leko were awarded a $2.5 million U.S. Department of Education Teacher Quality Partnership Grant to fund 40 graduate students who will work with students with disabilities in high-need and small, rural school districts across Wisconsin. “Special educators are sorely needed across Wisconsin — with the need particularly acute in small, rural districts and in schools that serve a high number of families and children who are economically disadvantaged,” says Wilkerson.
Mon
Nov
05
When UW–Madison was selected by Schmidt Futures as part of its Alliance for the American Dream Initiative, the grant came with a significant challenge: Produce innovative ideas for increasing the net income of 10,000 Dane County families by 10 percent by 2020. DreamUp Wisconsin, the local implementation effort launched to meet the challenge, has selected 11 proposals, from a total of 46 submitted by teams of community and university partners, which offer innovative ideas to grow and support Dane County’s middle class. And among those involved with a winning proposal is the School of Education’s Elizabeth Graue, who is collaborating with others on a multi-pronged approach to transform the early childhood and out-of-school time sectors.