Chloe’ Mayfield, Rehabilitation Psychology

To celebrate Black History Month, we asked some of our students in the School of Education to share about their UW–Madison experiences, their Black role models, and what Black History Month means to them. 

Photo of Chloe' Mayfield
Chloe’ Mayfield

Where are you from, and what brought you to UW–Madison?

I am from Indianapolis, Indiana, and I am transfer student. I transferred to UW–Madison because I wanted a sense of community within my school, while also having the opportunity to explore pre-health occupations for my future endeavors.

What is your major?

I am currently majoring in Rehabilitation Psychology with certificates in Athletic Healthcare and Leadership. I chose my major because I had the opportunity to volunteer with Adapted Fitness on campus. With this experience, I found my passion to help persons with disabilities in the healthcare field. For my certificates I really enjoy sports medicine and felt that it was a great fit to include with my major and focus on athletic populations. My leadership certificate reflects my experiences with different organizations I am a part of and my volunteering experiences.

What has been your favorite class or professor?

My favorite class has been Introduction to Black Women’s Studies.

"Black History Month to me is celebrating our heritage and the multitude of shades we come in... As we create more change for future generations, this is a time to celebrate all the accomplishments we have made thus far."

What does Black History Month mean to you?

Black History Month to me is celebrating our heritage and the multitude of shades we come in. Black History Month is a way to show pride for our past and present ancestors. As we create more change for future generations, this is a time to celebrate all the accomplishments we have made thus far.

Photo of Ida B. Wells
Ida B. Wells

Tell us about a Black role model you look up to and admire. Why?

A role model that I look up to is Ida B. Wells. She was influential by using her investigative skills to promote the truth about lynchings that took place in the South. She also was an early leader in the civil rights movement making her voice known and wanting to create change for the Black community.

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